All Hollowed Out – The lonely poverty of America’s white working class

For the last several months, social scientists have been debating the striking findings of a study by the economists Anne Case and Angus Deaton.* Between 1998 and 2013, Case and Deaton argue, white Americans across multiple age groups experienced large spikes in suicide and fatalities related to alcohol and drug abuse—spikes that were so large […]

Half of city residents make less than $35,000 a year, study says

Boston is a city of haves and have-nots, and a new study by the Boston Redevelopment Authority quantifies the growing divide, portraying the trend in stark numbers that show few benefits from the economic boom going to those near the bottom of the income scale. Despite much attention given to high-paying jobs in technology, biotechnology, […]

50 Years Later, War on Poverty Is a Mixed Bag

To many Americans, the war on poverty declared 50 years ago by President Lyndon B. Johnson has largely failed. The poverty rate has fallen only to 15 percent from 19 percent in two generations, and 46 million Americans live in households where the government considers their income scarcely adequate. But looked at a different way, […]

Disparity in Life Spans of the Rich and the Poor Is Growing

One of the most alarming results of growing economic inequality in the U.S. is the widening gap in life span between low and higher income individuals. Experts have long known that rich people generally live longer than poor people. But a growing body of data shows a more disturbing pattern: Despite big advances in medicine, […]